How do I know if my baby is full and not full? This is really not difficult.

In fact, I want to know that my baby is full and not full. This is really not difficult. Many mothers never even think about it. As long as the baby is energetic, happy, and sick, he has no troubles. But those “dedication” mothers are different. Dedicated mothers will arrange their baby’s life very delicately. Therefore, if you want to know if your baby is full, let’s take a look at the following.

First: Let’s take a look at how big the baby’s stomach is. It has a spectrum of the size of the stomach, and basically the number of the baby’s meal is also counted;

 

  • The size of the stomach of the newborn baby is about 5-7 ml;

 

  • The size of the baby’s stomach born for 3 days is about 22-27 ml;

 

  • The size of the baby’s stomach born 7 days is about 45-60 ml;

 

  • The size of the baby’s stomach at the full moon is about 80-150 ml;

Second: We all know that when the baby is full, the height and weight will grow well. On the contrary, if the child is not full, the growth of height and weight will be affected. Therefore, the growth curve is the most measure of whether the baby is full or not. The simple, most intuitive, and most scientific method, the growth curve is the greatest invention of the World Health Organization. As long as the baby can move forward steadily on the growth curve, it means that the baby is no problem to eat; if the parents really do not use the growth curve, Then use the following numbers to understand the basic growth rate of your baby, such as:

  • The daily weight gain of 0-3 months old baby is about 30 grams;

 

  • 3-6 months old baby’s daily weight gain is about 20 grams;

 

  • The daily weight gain of a 6-12 month-old baby is about 10 grams;

 

  • 2 years old – young children with weight gain of about 2 kg per year;

 

Third: Parents can also measure whether the baby has enough to eat through the daily milk demand. The daily milk requirements of different ages are as follows:

 

  • 0-12 months old: daily milk volume is about 600-1000 ml;

 

  • 12-24 months old: daily milk volume is about 400-600 ml;

 

  • 2-8 years old: daily milk volume is about 400-600 ml;

 

  • 9-18 years old: daily milk volume is about 720 ml;

Fourth: When the baby eats enough, there will be a relatively balanced urination and defecation, so the body fluid balance is also a measure to measure whether the baby has enough to eat, such as the number of urination of the baby at different ages:

 

  • The number of urination on the first day of birth is about 1 time;

 

  • The number of urination on the second day of birth is about 2-3 times;

 

  • The number of urination on the third and fourth days of birth is about 4-6 times;

 

  • The number of urinations per day after the fifth day of birth is about 6-8 times;

 

Because each baby’s stool frequency, traits, and weight variability are relatively large, it is not a primary measure.

Fifth: To measure whether a baby is full or not, it can pass some satiety signals, such as the baby actively loosening the nipple or pacifier, facial muscles and hand muscles gradually relax, satisfying after eating, and being able to sleep peacefully, etc., but these The signal lacks sufficient specificity and can be used as a reference

Original Article From: momcozy.com

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